Friday, March 15, 2013

A Look Into a 'Bring Your Own Device' (BYOD) Classroom

Students using their own device in the classroom? It sure is!

 

Recently, I discovered that I am part of some "73% of teachers," according to an article published by Mashable, who are using cell phones in the classroom with students for learning activities. Leveraging mobile devices for learning is nothing new, and many classrooms have invested in 1:1 device initiatives, such as iPads, for students. Despite its apparent benefits, this can be costly and not always the most beneficial route. Though the jury is still out on iPads for every student in the classroom, a much more accessible alternative exists--allow students to use the devices they already have. Of course, this approach is not going to look the same everywhere, nor at each grade level, yet it is still one worth exploring.

Many students are walking into classrooms each day with mobile technology, and often that technology is more powerful than the technology available to them at school. The potential for using devices in learning to collaborate, communicate, and create content is endless; however, policies currently in place in many schools make it challenging to allow teachers to explore device use in classrooms. Nonetheless, there are many aspects of Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) that can inspire schools get started in considering policy changes that would allow device use for learning. What is the potential for BYOD in the classroom? Seemingly, the possibilities are endless. The REMC Association of Michigan put on a showcase video, entitled the Connected Educator Series, featuring the BYOD teaching and learning that takes place in my classroom this year.

Students can engage in what is referred to as 21st century learning, create digital notes or portfolios, collaborate in real-time, journal and reflect on their own learning, or participate in blended learning opportunities. In my own classroom, we use devices for so many different aspects of science class, that it has rendered us nearly paperless. The basics of a BYOD policy for students should be not all that different than a policy for employees and adults in the workplace or higher education. To introduce some of the basic elements of BYOD, OnlineColleges.net put together this infographic illustrating what it is and some ideas for use. Getting a sense of the BYOD realm is the first step toward considering how it can function in your classroom.

  Going BYOD
 

34 comments:

  1. i like how you used a chart and a video.

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  2. I like the way you used links in your blog and the visual charts and videos

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  3. This is really cool. It's good to know that some teachers are taking steps to use the modern technology to move forward in education.

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  4. This is a good entry about technology in school

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  5. This blog was very insightful and i like the video

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  6. This post was very informational to people who would like to know how technology is used thought out teaching.

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  7. That was a pretty fascinating entry about students and technology. I wish more class used technology, I'd probably be more engaged into what's happening in class. Thanks for the great read, Mr. Abud.

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  8. That seems like a high percentage of teachers that allow cell phones in class.

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  9. Using devices in class are great and espeacially when they are your own.

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  10. this blog was very neat in organized it was great

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  11. I enjoyed the video, wish 3rd hour could of been apart of the experience.

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  12. hola senior abud, como te llama? Me llama Angela.

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  13. Very well written. High five!

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  14. I liked how you made a video as a trailer. You also included an informative, bright, and colorful diagram that wasn't just the good things, but also the potential bad things.

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  15. That was very informative and fun to read

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  16. the video was awesome and how you use technology in class

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  17. High in technology, low in failure

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  18. the visual information like charts and graphs made everything a lot more easy to understand

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  19. I really liked the chart that you put in. The graphics made it easy to understand the facts.

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  20. The visual at the end was really informative along with the information provided in the written text. I really liked how, this being a controversial topic, both sides of this topic!

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  21. The blog is really well written, I enjoyed the overall talk of how modern technology has become even more advanced than the school technology. The pictures, and the video add pizzazz!

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  22. I like how you mentioned both sides of using technology in the classroom and had great pictures and data to support your opinion

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  23. I liked how you used charts and graphs to show the information. Makes is much easier to understand.

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  24. I like the diagrams you used, it was very organized

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  25. The video added a nice touch as well as your stats.

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  26. This blog entry was very well written and you gave your thoughts on the topic. You also had many links to learn more about technology in the class room. There was a great picture at the very end and a video of your own classroom.

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  27. I liked that you included the video in your blog. It was very organized and the ideas in it flowed well. The diagram also helped me understand your ideas.

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  28. Adding in statistics really made the blog more interesting to read.

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  29. I enjoyed the visual appeal of the overall blog, the video and extended informational picture were also very helpful. They aided in the overall understanding and was well done.

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